Tag Archives: glossy

Mediterranean home & lifestyle mag Côté Sud launches Dutch edition

A Dutch version of the home magazine with Mediterranean flavor Côté Sud Magazine  is to launch shortly.  The magazine caters to those who are keen on the Riviera lifestyle and fond of  products and flavors from all over Mediterranean sea.
  
It is the fourth international edition to be launched in Dutch-speaking Belgium (“Flemish” is the language to be precise) and Holland with a print run of 50 000 copies (25 000 in Belgium and just as many in The Netherlands).  The title will be published in 285 x 225 mm perfect-bound format and glossy paper.

 

French Marie Claire’s October issue comes out with a refreshed look and feel

Marie Claire Group just launched a new version on its flagship edition Marie Claire in France on September 9 (October issue).  The issue features French actress Mélanie Thierry on the cover.

The monthly title has  a circulation of 430 124 copies per issue (DFP 2009), but aims to get back to its “fundamentals” i.e. to engage more with readers and voice its opinion more publicly especially on key women’s issues, under the impulse of its new Editorial Director Christine Leiritz, who succeeded Tina Kieffer at the end of 2009.

Click to have a peak inside the October issue of Marie Claire France.

Click to purchase a digital issue of Marie Claire on Relay.com.

France: Lagardère and Marie Claire merge their women’s magazines Be and Envy

As revealed by Presse News yesterday, the French media giants Lagardère Active et Marie-Claire Group have decided to merge their respective new women’s weeklies Be and Envy, only six months after their launch.  A conference call betweek Lagardère Active‘s CEO, Didier Quillot, and Marie Claire’s, Jean-Paul Lubot, was planned this morning to clarify the details of the transaction, but according to Presse News again, the last issue of Envy would be published at the end of september.  The Be brand is the one likely to survive in an enriched version fueled by some part of Envy’s former editorial team. 

Out of 40, only about 15 journalists among Envy‘s editorial team will move over to Be (DSH OJD: 171 085 copies per week). Jean-Paul Lubot explained the closure by a very competitive segment and lagging circulation figures (DSH OJD 2010: 174 280 copies per week), well below Envy’s break even point of 200 000.  Also, ad sales had been disappointing.

That’s not a huge surprise to me since Envy looked like the poorer one from scratch amongst the three women’s weeklies launched in France between August 2009 and Spring 2010.  I didn’t see the merger coming, but considering the strong ties that unite Lagardère and MCG, it makes sense, rather than just folding EnvyGrazia seems to be winning the battle of the Paris weeklies and this is not a bad move for Lagardère, which protects its longtime champion Elle (weekly in France) by helping to kill a competitor.

Condé Nast to plan more upscale magazine launches in India

According to a recent article published in the FT, Condé Nast International reveals it is ready to follow the September 2009 launch of the Indian edition of Vogue with other upmarket titles as the global fashion and luxury retail industry looks to cash in on the country’s growing affluence.

The American publisher is seeking or has obtained regulatory approval for magazines such as Glamour, GQ, Condé Nast Traveller, Vanity Fair and niche publications such as Wired, the technology-focused magazine.

“We’d like to get the Vogue launch right first and soon after that start kicking off some of these other launches,” said Alex Kuruvilla, managing director of Condé Nast India, in the FT article.

India is emerging as one of the world’s biggest “millionaire factories”, with a study by Cap Gemini and Merrill Lynch showing it was second only to Singapore in terms of the growth in the number of people with net assets of $1m or more.

But it is not that easy to enter the Indian market.  Indeed, the luxury retail industry faces many hurdles there  from a lingering cultural and political aversion to conspicuous displays of wealth, with many people still living in deep poverty. It also faces challenges from high taxes and a lack of suitable malls for luxury retailers.

Mr Kuruvilla said Vogue would launch its first edition with an October cover date on September 22 with a target print run of 50 000 copies, taking on titles such as Elle, L’Officiel and local magazine Verve.  He added that these magazines had targeted a middle-market audience while Vogue was looking to cater for the new class of high-net worth consumers emerging in India.  He said the magazine was expecting advertising yields of four to five times the existing competition and to capture 50-60% market share of fashion-related advertising revenue in the first year.

In China, Vogue broke even in its first year, capitalizing on the rise of the affluent classes there. “I don’t think we’d be too far behind in terms financial achievements albeit with a smaller model,” Mr Kuruvilla said of the Indian operation.

The launch of Vogue follows the entry into India of luxury retailers, such as Ermenegildo Zegna, the high-end Italian men’s wear company, and Hermès, the French luxury goods maker.  According to Mr Kuruvilla, India’s luxury retail market is ripe for a “tipping point”. It was only a matter of time before “it all explodes into a combination of the purchasing power, fuelled by mall access points and, most importantly, by the fact that there are so many of these luxury players coming in right now”.

On the other hand, as Ranjan Biswas, partner and head of retail with Ernst & Young, countered in the article, India first needs more high-end malls before the industry could take off. “I think as the high-end mall becomes a reality, luxury retailers will start to have more meaningful footfalls,” Mr Biswas added.  Maybe Vogue can invest in a Vogue-branded Mall as well.  Hasn´t Condé Nast International already started to dabble in the restaurant business?

Middle-East: Grazia to launch new English-language edition in Bahrain with ITP

Mondadori and ITP have signed an agreement for the publication of the Bahrain edition of fashion magazine Grazia, which is expected to hit the newsstands in September.

Edited by Kerrie Simon, Grazia Bahrain will be published monthly in English and will be the only English-language weekly luxury fashion magazine in the Middle East. The mix of exclusive and attention-grabbing A-list news, combined with an inside track on local and international style, makes Grazia a must-read for fashion lovers across the region. In their own words, readers are “addicted” to the weekly fix of fashion that Grazia guarantees

Circulation for the new foreign edition of the Italian magazine brand is expected to be over 10 000 copies per issue and it will be distributed both through newsstands and at large-scale retail outlets with special display stands.

The Bahrain edition will operate alongside Grazia United Arab Emirates, which was launched (also under a licensing agreement with ITP) in November 2005.

The cover price of Grazia Bahrain will be BH1 (or about €2).  Click to download full media kit in PDF.

Madame Figaro will celebrate its 30th anniversary on October 30th

Madame Figaro will celebrate its 30th anniversary on October 30th by offering its readers four key issues reflecting the main editorial themes of the women’s glossy magazine supplement. 

Indeed, the October 30 issue will be dedicated to “beauty”, the November 6 to “luxury”, the November 13 to “fashion” and the November 20 to “fashion design”. More to come on this blog as we’ll get closer to autumn…

USA: Paper or Plastic? asks Condé Nast in its new ad campaign

Check out Condé Nast’s latest corporate campaign showcasing the publisher’s print and digital components of its media brands (below).

The official website reads: “Everyday, Condé Nast connects with new consumers in new ways, whether they are subscribing to our print publications, visiting our websites, or experiencing our brands on the latest electronic devices. Scroll the titles shown here and discover how you can now enjoy Condé Nast’s high-quality content anywhere, any way, anytime.”